Netflix’s Troll (2022) Honors & Trolls the Genre

From Norwegian studio, Motion Blur, in partnership with Netflix comes a kaiju of the Scandinavian sort. Troll, like the modern classic Trollhunter (2010), exhibits Norwegian folklore on a monstrous scale. Unlike, Trollhunter, however, this new film by aptly-named director Roar Uthaug (Tomb Raider, 2018) is satisfied with the bare minimum - it achieves this surprisingly … Continue reading Netflix’s Troll (2022) Honors & Trolls the Genre

How ‘Frankenstein Conquers the World’ Confronts the Monstrous Legacy of Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Frankenstein Conquers the World marks a departure from Honda's usual kaiju-fare of the mid '60s; however, it also marks a welcomed return to his horror aesthetic. Frankenstein features many graphic images that are intentionally brief and bloody, thereby leaving a lasting impression. The same is true for Honda's use of close-ups, especially on the titular … Continue reading How ‘Frankenstein Conquers the World’ Confronts the Monstrous Legacy of Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Rebirth of Mothra (1996)

Discovering the stand alone Mothra trilogy is like finding $20 in your pocket. It’s such an wonderful surprise being treated to something you never expected. That is what Rebirth of Mothra promises for any kaiju fan, with Mothra/Godzilla enthusiasts getting a particular kick out of it. Director: Okihiro YonedaWriters: Masumi SuetaniRun Time: 106 minutesJapanese Theatrical … Continue reading Rebirth of Mothra (1996)

Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964)

It may sound like hyperbole, but Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964) is one of the most fun movies I've ever seen: a blast of visual splendor, offhand bizarreness, and kaiju-fighting mayhem from first frame to last. It was Ishiro Honda's sixth Godzilla film (after directing and co-writing the original film that spawned it all) and … Continue reading Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964)

Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)

Godzilla vs. Megalon epitomizes the "best of times, worst of times" period of Godzilla films in the early 1970s; it exhibits the pure kaiju camp that makes these years so memorable, while also displaying the human snooze-fest that renders them equally forgettable. Jun Fukuda returns as director, having previously helmed Godzilla vs. Gigan (1972), Son … Continue reading Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973)